lud3Ever heard of Ludmilla Petrushevskaya? Her first collection in translation was called THERE ONCE LIVED A WOMAN WHO TRIED TO KILL HER NEIGHBOR’S BABY. They were scary modern fairy tales. It won a World Fantasy award and actually ended up on a few major best-of-the-year lists. Then came the second collection, THERE ONCE LIVED A GIRL WHO SEDUCED HER SISTER’S HUSBAND, AND HE HANGED HIMSELF. Those were love stories. Now two of her most famous, prize-winning pieces are included in the most recent collection and my March Pick, THERE ONCE LIVED A MOTHER WHO LOVED HER CHILDREN, UNTIL THEY MOVED BACK IN. These little glimpses into reality read faster than a speeding bullet and are just about as friendly. You’ve never read anything like them. Meet a little Russian grandma who tells it like it is.

lud2THERE ONCE LIVED A MOTHER WHO LOVED HER CHILDREN, UNTIL THEY MOVED BACK IN

by Ludmilla Petrushevskaya

Regular price $16

20% off at University Book Store

Our price $12.80

 

DIRTY SECRETS AND PERSONAL TRAGEDIES IN THE REAL RUSSIA OF TODAY

 77-year-old Ludmilla Petrushevskaya is arguably Russia’s best-known living writer, the author of over one hundred stories.

Babushka.

Grimly witty, uncomfortably realistic, her deadpan tales of everyday Russians are candid and spare, frank and funny. She portrays the constant drama of maternal love surviving in domestic hell.

These are not the atrocities of work camps, but the sufferings inflicted by loved ones upon each other across the hall. Her heroines are tired, scared, impoverished women crowded into cramped, identical concrete communal apartments.

Petrushevskaya dares to be open-eyed and open-mouthed about the breakdown of traditional human values. Her daringly honest, oddly comic tales show ordinary families bitterly at war with each other and themselves.

Come discuss the book with us!

Nick’s Book Club

UNIVERSITY BOOK STORE

4326 University Way NE

The Bookstore Café

Monday, 30, 6 pm

Homeless as a child, widowed while she was still young, this incredible author was one of the first proponents of the women’s fiction movement in modern Russia. A caregiver to both her mother and her grandson, she is currently a Moscow nightclub singer. Her work was suppressed for many years, and remained banned in Russia long after Solzhenitsyn was published.

Be adventuresome. Give her a try. And I sincerely hope to see some of you  on the Ave at 6 pm in the lovely newly-refurbished Book Store Café. See you there! — Nick